Meet the ‘Micro Flip’ (before and after)

Hello friends. I’m happy to report I’ve completed another flip house! #happydance

This one was a little different in that we only did a very small amount of work to the property, to keep it uber-affordable for the buyers, which are dear friends of ours.

We actually had the buyers for the property before we ever bought it ourselves, so it was an interesting set of circumstances.

Now the new family can continue the rehab journey, putting their own stamp on this beautiful home as they see fit.

Meet Micro Flip!

This adorable Craftsman-style home has beautiful space and features, like hardwood flooring throughout (although some is still under the carpets), and some key updates, like vinyl replacement windows and siding. We purchased it through a foreclosure auction site. It was in pretty sad shape, but the bones were good.

Notice the American flag … it’s becoming my signature on all the properties I flip.

Our friends needed to finance the property, but some key things needed to be accomplished to make it through a strict loan process.

We took care of those things, along with a lot of help from the new homeowners. We also added our own stamp on the place by doing a quick cosmetic update in the master bath and kitchen. We had to be VERY cognizant of budget on this one and keep the rehab low key, as affordability was the main factor for the buyers.

Some of the items accomplished at this home included:

  • Replacing frozen/damaged plumbing
  • Changing the front door hardware
  • Power-washing the front of the home
  • Scraping and painting the front porch ceiling
  • Sealing the porch foundation
  • Removing the dilapidated fence in the backyard
  • Jack-hammering out a set of concrete “stairs to nowhere” in the backyard
  • Scraping, patching and painting the master bathroom ceiling and walls
  • Installing new bath and shower hardware
  • Installing a new toilet in the main bathroom
  • Stripping wallpaper, scraping walls and sanding and priming the master closet
  • Priming the walls and fixing the ceiling in one of the bedrooms
  • Scraping and priming the attic walls
  • Updating the kitchen with a fresh coat of paint on the ceiling, walls and cabinetry
  • Installing beadboard molding wallpaper and trim in the kitchen
  • Sanding and refinishing the kitchen floors
  • Repairing the main systems (HVAC, water, electrical, roof, foundation) as necessary, confirming they’re functional and passed inspection
  • Scraping and painting the basement walls
  • Cleaning.

I’m sure I’ve missed something but these were the main squeeze. Now for the before and after pics!

KITCHEN BEFORE

KITCHEN AFTER

Walls are a custom mix of Sherwin Williams Anew Gray and Oatlands Subtle Taupe. Cabinets are Sherwin Williams Keystone Gray. Floors are Kona stain and clear satin finish. We kept the existing countertops and hardware.

The art is mostly from Hobby Lobby (and my basement lol). I sewed a quick set of curtains from inexpensive Hobby Lobby fabric.

The rug is from Target.

MASTER BATHROOM BEFORE

I can’t show you the “before” of the other side of the master bath because it would give you nightmares. #nokidding

Check out the color of that soapy water!

MASTER BATHROOM AFTER

MASTER CLOSET BEFORE

MASTER CLOSET AFTER

And here’s a little peek at the downstairs living and dining rooms. We didn’t really do much but clean in there.

The cool, inspiring thing about this particular project was that the buyers rolled up their sleeves and helped out, so we could keep the selling price affordable for them. It was truly an amazing – albeit exhausting – experience for all of us.

I’m confident this amazing family is now buying a move-in ready home with fantastic equity that is safe, clean and super cute! I look forward to seeing how they put their own stamp on the place.

I was so blessed to be part of such a meaningful project and to help well-deserving, hard-working folks buy their first home together, where they can raise their beautiful children. This is what fuels me! Here’s a pic of us after we got done with everything … all smiles.

Meet the Lewises! (Me on the left, Lewises on the right)

I’m so happy with how things turned out. This certainly wasn’t an easy project (which one has been?) and there were a lot of hurdles to jump, but it was well worth the effort.

Here’s the crazy part … Although there are certainly other expenses associated with a flip (buying/selling costs, holding costs, insurance etc.) I was able to do the work here with under $1,700 in rehab funds. I’ll likely never be able to accomplish something like this again, and the homeowners chipped in as well. We put in some serious sweat equity for a truly successful project that will bless the Lewises for years to come.

What do you think of our “micro flip?”

Last-minute DIY gift idea

Hello friends! I hope you are enjoying this wonderful Christmas season. We are, for sure, although I wish (as usual) I was a little more prepared.

Today I wanted to share with you a quick, easy and inexpensive holiday gift you still have time to whip up for the folks on your list. 😉

You can knock about 10 of these out in less than 3 hours.

Step 1: Order 1-hour prints from Walmart.com.

You can pick up a copy of the free printable I used here. I also like to browse Pinterest for “Free holiday printables.” I chose 4×5.3″ prints at about 6 cents apiece. I rounded the edges of each print with scissors.

Step 2: Find a scrap board to use for the backs of the signs.

I chose these 2×6″ scrap boards from my garden shed.

Step 3: Cut 2×6″ boards to length on a miter saw.

This size is perfect because you don’t have to rip off any of the width. You only need to cut the pieces length-wise.

I cut my pieces about 6.5 inches long. (My prints were 4×5.3″ – or true digital size.) After cutting, I cleaned off the boards really well to prepare them for stain.

Step 4: Stain the pieces.

I chose Varathane® Wood Stain in Briarsmoke.* I like to brush stain on and allow it to soak in for a good two minutes before wiping any excess off. It creates a more uniform, rich color.

Step 5: Sand the edges of each piece.

This will give the blocks a weathered appearance and smooth any rough edges. I used an orbital sander for this step to help speed things along.

Step 6: Adhere the prints to the wood blocks using Mod Podge® matte water-based sealer. 

This part always makes me nervous, but the sealer dries clear. I promise. 😉

Done! The wood plaques stand up nicely on their own, making them cute decorations for window sills and tabletops at Christmastime.

Have you DIYed any gifts this holiday season? I’d love for you to share your project(s) in a comment.

* Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a link provided and make a purchase through Amazon using my affiliation, I may receive compensation from Amazon. It does not cost you any more to purchase products using affiliate links. This blog is independently owned by me, and the opinions expressed here are my own. Thanks for supporting the quality content provided here through your readership and the use of affiliate links.  

No-cost DIY holiday sign

Hello friends! Today I wanted to share with you a quick and easy, no-cost DIY solution for your outdoor holiday decor.

When our family decorates for Christmas, it takes days … DAYS, people … for me to get just the inside of our home decorated. I’m typically pooped out after that with no motivation to do much in the way of outdoor decor.

My dear husband put out some strands of light and two light show thingies this year, which makes the place look pretty festive. But I also wanted to add something special to the front porch.

Are you familiar with those large (5 feet+) holiday signs you can just lean against the side of your house? Well last week I decided to make one for myself … at no cost.

Step 1: Choose a scrap board and cut it to size.

I found this scrap piece of plywood inside our garden shed. It was already the perfect size for my project. I think it measures about 5 feet by 14 inches or so.

I cleaned it with bleach spray to kill a patch of mold/mildew at the bottom (these stains will bleed through paint).

Then it was ready for a quick coat of Rust-Oleum® Chalked Paint.*

Step 2: Apply one to two coats of paint.

I chose Rust-Oleum® Chalked Paint in Linen White.

This stuff covers really well, with no need for primer to be applied. I applied two coats to the entire front side of the wood. I added the second coat about an hour after the first coat. This paint dries very quickly to a matte, chalk-like finish.

Step 3: Sand the piece after the paint dries.

I used an inexpensive orbital sander to “rough up” the paint finish and edges a bit. This gave the sign a rustic, aged appearance.

Step 4: Pencil on letters.

I simply hand drew my letters for the sign on with a pencil, using a paint stir stick to keep the lines straight and working off an inspiration image from Pinterest. I chose the word “Noel,” but “Joy” would work just as well for a similar project.

Step 5: Fill in the letters with paint, leaving the “O” space blank.

I like the metallic stencil creme line from Royal Design Studio for small craft projects like this. I used a beautiful red metallic paint, which gives a nice shimmer to the piece.

Step 6: Staple garland to the wood in an “O” shape.

I added a few sprigs of faux berries to my evergreen garland strand to complete the missing “O” in my sign. Done! 

I created this piece in one afternoon using leftover wood, paint and holiday garland I had on hand at the house. I love finding ways to decorate using what I already have, don’t you?

What do you think of the final result? Have you DIYed any holiday decor this year? I’d love for you to share the details of your project in a comment.

 

* Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a link provided and make a purchase through Amazon using my affiliation, I may receive compensation from Amazon. It does not cost you any more to purchase products using affiliate links. This blog is independently owned by me, and the opinions expressed here are my own. Thanks for supporting the quality content provided here through your readership and the use of affiliate links.