Bedroom before and after at the flip house

Hello friends! Over the past week and a half, I have been working overtime at the flip house, which means the poor blog has taken a back seat. But today I’m here¬†to share with you a bedroom before and after. This room at the flip house – especially the carpet – used to be a total nightmare. Now it makes me smile every time I look at it.

I chose to stage the space as an office because it is the gateway to the upstairs master suite. And I also took the after pictures before I rehung the doors in the room, so keep that in mind. ūüėČ

Let’s take a peek at the before, shall we?

Bedroom-2-before

Below is a snapshot of this desperate DIYer on the night I hauled out all the 60s-style carpeting in this room by myself. I admit, it was an endeavor I would be happy to never repeat again. The dust alone nearly killed me because, well, how much dust can a carpet accumulate since 1960? A lot, people. A whole lot.

Me-ripping-out-carpet

The main work I did to renovate this room – besides replacing the flooring – involved texturing the walls and ceiling; rebuilding the interior of the closet; painting the walls, ceiling and trim; and decorating.

I chose this smooth, roll-on texture*¬†for the walls and ceiling to even out any imperfections in the plaster. I love this product! There are different types of roll-on texture you can buy. I prefer¬†the smooth finish because I’m not a fan of heavy texture, just a subtle effect.

Textured-wall

For the wall color, I chose Sherwin Williams Comfort Gray. I had the color mixed up in the Valspar Signature paint (eggshell finish) line from Lowe’s. It’s more affordable at $32 a gallon, yet I find it gives a really¬†professional-grade finish.

I painted the ceiling white and added an inexpensive 50s-style fixture to match the period of the home.

50s-style-ceiling-light

After texturing, painting, cleaning, replacing the light, outlets and switches, and having new carpet installed, I was ready to add the finishing touches to this room.

Comfort-Gray-bedroom-4

Comfort-Gray-bedroom-2

My budget – as always – was extremely tight, so I stuck with no and low-cost furniture and decor options.

I found a cherry table for under $10 at a thrift store awhile back. When I bought it, I wasn’t ready to refinish¬†it yet, so it went to¬†the basement.

Desk-before

This table looks so good now in the flip house I’m relunctant to let it go with the house. The coolest part about this project is that it was super easy – and quick.¬†All told, it took about two hours of work total. Seriously.

Step 1: I used a scrub pad and some Rust-Oleum¬ģ deglosser to “rough up” the surface. The deglosser I used was left over from a Rust-Oleum Cabinet Transformations kit I had on hand after my bathroom vanity makeover. I’ll be using the rest of this kit to transform the cabinets at the flip house. Stay tuned for that project coming soon.

Rust-Oleum-deglosser

Step 2: I thinned with water (by about 15 percent) a bit of Rust-Oleum Chalked Paint in Aged Gray and loaded it into my paint sprayer. I sprayed on a coat of paint and let it dry. This process took about 15 minutes total. A paint sprayer certainly makes light work of furniture and cabinet painting. (I use the HomeRight¬ģ Finish Max.)¬†After about an hour,¬†I applied a second coat of Aged Gray with the sprayer.

Rust-Oleum-chalked-paint

Step 3: I applied a coat of wax to the piece to seal the paint.

Step 4: I used some elbow grease and a soft cloth to rub off some paint in select areas, giving the piece a custom, aged patina.

Chalked-paint-closeup-2

Chalked-paint-closeup Rust-Oleum-Chalked-paint-closeup

I am so pleased with how this desk – and the room – has come along. As far as the rest of the decor in the space, I stole from my house and the basement to complete the look. No money spent there.

I also used leftover door casing from the front door we replaced and some leftover spindles from the front porch build to build a fun ladder for storing blankets.

Old-door-frame-ladder

I love repurposing pieces of the old house into the projects I do. It preserves the history Рand memory Рof the home.

What do you think of the transformation?

Bedroom-before-and-after

If you would give this makeover a thumbs up, I would love it if you would hop over to the Rust-Oleum Creator’s Studio¬†and vote for my desk to win the Thrift Store Challenge. Thanks in advance for your vote! ūüôā¬†You can vote¬†HERE.

*Affiliate link provided for your convenience

Front door hardware and porch ‘jewelry’ at the flip house

Hello friends! Today I wanted to share with you some of the details on the new door and front porch at the flip house.

If you recall, last week I shared the before and after of the new, red front door.

Door-before

And after:

New-front-door

Modern-Masters-Sophisticated-red-door

I used Modern Masters¬ģ Front Door Paint in the Sophisticated color.

For the hardware, I chose the¬†Schlage Connect‚ĄĘ with¬†handleset and¬†accent lever.

Schlage-install

This is the exact set I installed on the front door at my primary home. I cannot say enough good things about this hardware. I love, love, love it!

Schlage-Connect-hardware Schlage-handle-closeup Schlage-touchscreen-keypad

If I ever move, the first thing I’m installing at my new home is one of these handlesets. The touchscreen feature is so convenient and it doesn’t interfere with the beautiful aesthetics of the hardware. For step-by-step instructions on¬†how to install this set, check out this post.

Along with¬†the Schlage hardware, I installed this 1950s knocker to the door for more “bling” and to¬†add¬†a special feature¬†true to the period of the home. I purchased this on eBay for $11.

50s-door-knockerI gave it a coat of Rust-Oleum¬ģ flat black primer, then a coat of oil-rubbed bronze metallic spray paint, to¬†match the hardware.

Rust-Oleum-primer Rust-Oleum-black-primer

Here’s the final result of that quick project:

50s-style-door-knocker

Schlage-red-front-door Schlage-red-door

I added some accessories to the porch as well, to give it a more upscale feel and tie all the colors together. I painted an old planter with the same Rust-Oleum ORB spray paint I used for the knocker, then added some faux greenery from Hobby Lobby.

Urn-planter Planter-with-faux-greenery

The rug is from Ross. I think I paid $12 for it.

I found an adorable plaid, wool blanket at a thrift store that had all the right colors in the porch palette.

Plaid-wool-blanket-and-pillow

I bought¬†the pillow for $7 at Gabes. I gave it a good coat of Rust-Oleum NeverWet¬ģ to weatherproof it.

NeverWetI used my paint sprayer to give new life to an old porch swing left at the property. I chose a water-based solid stain in a mahogany color.

Brown-Porch-swing

What do you think of the porch “jewelry?”

Schlage-red-door

Special thanks to Schlage for providing, at my request, the handleset for this door, and to Rust-Oleum for providing the spray paint and NeverWet. As always, all opinions and projects are 100 percent mine.  

Flipping 101: The beginner’s guide to finding properties

In the world of investment real estate, the methods for finding good deals on properties is endless, complicated and, admittedly, somewhat headache-inducing. The more experienced you become as an investor, the more creative, profitable and less competitive the deals become.

But yours truly is just a baby flipper and, at this stage in the game, I’ve got limited ways to access the good deals out there. Maybe you’re in the same boat! So today I thought I’d share with some of the places¬†I know to look when seeking out a¬†first flip.

Follow-This-Flip-with-Susan

Multiple Listing Service – This is simply the place¬†where all the licensed real estate firms announce the stuff that’s up for sale. Anyone can access the MLS (which means you’re competing with a lot¬†of folks for deals) online by visiting places like Realtor.com, Trulia.com or MLS.com.

Although I didn’t find my current flip through the web, I did find several good candidates there that I placed offers on. Of course,¬†real estate brokers or agents are associated with MLS listings, so the profit margin is lower because their commissions must be factored into the price of sale.

AuctionZip¬†– This is where you can find¬†real estate auctions happening on any given date in your target community. Depending on how motivated the seller(s) is, you can get a great deal on a property at a real estate auction. You’ll need to be prepared to make a sizable down payment and be able to gather¬†the total amount of money needed within a fairly short time. This can be a great route if you’ve got all the cash in hand. (I didn’t. I had 20 percent in cash, but needed to finance the rest through my local bank.)

Distressed property owners – When I start looking for my next flip, this will probably be where I concentrate the bulk of my efforts. You can find distressed property owners by putting an ad in the local paper stating you “buy ugly houses.” Or you can also keep a lookout¬†for homes that appear uninhabited;¬†are not being maintained;¬†or¬†have a “For Rent” or “For Sale by Owner” sign out front. These are clues that a homeowner may be motivated to sell at a great price. Scoring properties this way doesn’t involve any real estate commissions, so the profit margin could potentially be higher.

Craiglist – This can be another good source for finding commission-free properties and distressed property owners.

Realtors – This is actually how I found my first flip. For some reason, the search engines in all the online spots I checked never showed that magical property my realtor introduced me to. This may have been a factor in why the place didn’t get snatched up sooner. I’m not sure.

At any rate, realtors are often aware of properties that are for sale (or coming up for sale) before the general public finds out about them. I have an awesome, motivated realtor who is always on the lookout for places I might be interested in. To return the favor, I’m happy to have her¬†sell my rehabbed properties for me. She gets the privilege of selling the same house twice (and earning the commission twice) in a short amount of time, and I get the privilege of having an “insider” keeping watch¬†for great deals and proactively working to sell what I put back on the market. Good realtors can be worth their weight in gold!

The methods above are by no means all-inclusive. I just wanted to highlight the main ones I hit up regularly when I’m “on the hunt.”

Do you have any other great ways to find investment properties? Please share in a comment! Also, don’t forget to sign up to win a Duluth Trading Company gift card and get geared up with the clothing that helps me¬†get my¬†house flip on. Enter¬†the giveaway here.